How do you deal with a bad code?

Dealing with death is unavoidable for many nurses. We see it often. It’s not something nursing school can teach you. And it’s surely not anything you can read out of a book. How you recover emotionally will set the pace of your career, especially if you work in acute care. But, how do you gather yourself after an “arrest” that rocked you to your core?

Here are some things I suggest:

  • Recognize its importance
  • Talk about it
  • Allow them to die with dignity
  • It’s an honor
  • Treat every single death like it’s the first
  • It’s absolutely OK to cry
  • Take care of yourself
  • Do something for someone else
  • Find the balance
  • Debrief

And the one thing that you should NEVER do…? Check out the video below for my answer:

**IMPORTANT NOTICE** This was a recording from my Instagram account, so it’s not the highest quality (wonky formatting). Some of the video content and conversation is out of context, but I thought the information was valuable and wanted to share it here. I hope you don’t mind.

 

Want more nursing resources? http://bit.ly/2Bck3BL


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____________________________________________________
The views and opinions expressed on this website and/or in the videos on this channel are that of myself and not of any educational institution. In compliance with HIPAA and to ensure patient privacy, all patient identifiers in all content have been deleted and/or altered. The views expressed on this website and/or in the videos on this channel are personal opinions only, not intended as medical advice. The information I present is for general knowledge purposes only.
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The #1 trait of all successful nurses

What do I consider to be the most important personality trait of a nurse? Caring? Compassionate? There are SO many things a nurse should be, but if I had to pick one trait that trumps them all. The ONE trait that will almost always guarantee success…

GRIT

Passion and perseverance over a long period of time. Sticking to your goal regardless of how it goes (day in and day out).

Dealing with the CRAP we face every single day without losing your “why”… why you decided to become a nurse.

Having a strong “bounce-back”.

Advocating for a human being is hard damn work. Check out my answer below:

**IMPORTANT NOTICE** This was a recording from my Instagram account, so it’s not the highest quality (wonky formatting). Some of the video content and conversation is out of context, but I thought the information was valuable and wanted to share it here. I hope you don’t mind.

 

 

Oh, and I have to give credit where credit is due –> Angel Lee Duckworth


DON’T FORGET TO SIGN UP FOR EMAIL UPDATES –> HERE!
If you enjoy my work and want to support me creating new and exciting content, I’m on Patreon! With your help, I can expand and create even cooler stuff. Check me out and donate: https://www.patreon.com/seanpdent
____________________________________________________
**Follow me on Instagram: @seanpdent
**Facebook Live every week: http://bit.ly/2hd3M8X
**Let’s continue the conversation: bitly.com/thenursetribe
**Have a question? https://heysean.info/
**Buy me a coffee? http://bit.ly/seanscoffee
____________________________________________________
The views and opinions expressed on this website and/or in the videos on this channel are that of myself and not of any educational institution. In compliance with HIPAA and to ensure patient privacy, all patient identifiers in all content have been deleted and/or altered. The views expressed on this website and/or in the videos on this channel are personal opinions only, not intended as medical advice. The information I present is for general knowledge purposes only.
*may contain affiliate links*